Exploiting Biological Systems: Toward Eco-Friendly and High-Efficiency Rechargeable Batteries

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Title
Exploiting Biological Systems: Toward Eco-Friendly and High-Efficiency Rechargeable Batteries
Author(s)
Byungju Lee; Youngmin Ko; Giyun Kwon; Sechan Lee; Kyojin Ku; JIhyeon Kim; Kisuk Kang
Publication Date
2018-01
Journal
Joule, v.2, no.1, pp.61 - 75
Publisher
CELL PRESS
Abstract
To meet the ever-increasing energy demands and sustainability requirements, next-generation battery systems must provide superior energy densities while employing eco-friendly components. Transition metal oxide-based materials have served as important high-energy-density battery electrodes over the past few decades; however, their further development is challenging as we approach the theoretical limits arising from their crystal structures and constituting elements. Exploiting materials from biological systems, or bio-inspiration, offers an alternative strategy to overcome the conventional energy storage mechanism through the chemical diversity, highly efficient biochemistry, sustainability, and natural abundance provided by these materials. Here, we overview recent progress in biomimetic research focused on novel electrode material design for rechargeable batteries, exploiting redox-active molecules involved in the biometabolism and diverse bioderived materials with various morphologies. Successful demonstrations of energy storage using biomimetic materials that simultaneously exhibit outstanding performance and sustainability would provide insight toward the development of an eco-friendly and high-efficiency energy storage system. Conventional battery electrodes, which mainly consist of heavy transition metal oxide materials, are believed to soon reach their limitations. In an effort to develop future battery electrodes, exploiting biological knowledge is considered a promising approach. Bio-organisms have evolved over a long period of time in the pursuit of optimal systems; thus, taking advantage of their functions including energy transduction reaction and morphological evolution can offer a new insight into the design of electrode materials for energy storage. While the exploration of biomimetic materials and their applications to energy storage is in its infancy, numerous materials remain to be investigated due to the diversity of biological systems. The discovery of new redox-active molecules can trigger the synthetic efforts of related organic electrodes with optimization processes, leading to a new group of active electrode materials beyond conventional electrodes. The exploration of new hierarchical structures in biosystems can inspire cost-effective and highly efficient electrode fabrication on the nano- and microscale. We believe that learning lessons from biological systems for advanced electrode materials and structures will offer a new perspective and accelerate the development of battery electrodes. Current battery electrodes, which mainly consist of transition metal oxide-based materials, are believed to be insufficient for future applications because of their theoretical limits arising from crystal structures and constituting elements. Exploiting biologically inspired/derived materials that are abundant, sustainable, and efficient can be an alternative strategy to overcome the conventional energy storage mechanism. In this perspective, we overview recent progress in biomimetic research focused on novel electrode material design for rechargeable battery systems. © 2017 Elsevier Inc
URI
https://pr.ibs.re.kr/handle/8788114/4724
ISSN
2542-4351
Appears in Collections:
Center for Nanoparticle Research(나노입자 연구단) > Journal Papers (저널논문)
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