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Cucurbit[n]uril-based amphiphiles that self-assemble into functional nanomaterials for therapeutics

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Title
Cucurbit[n]uril-based amphiphiles that self-assemble into functional nanomaterials for therapeutics
Author(s)
Kyeng Min Park; Moon Young Hur; Suman Kr Ghosh; Deepak Ramdas Boraste; Sungwan Kim; Kimoon Kim
Publication Date
2019-09
Journal
CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, v.55, no.72, pp.10654 - 10664
Publisher
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY
Abstract
Some host-guest complexes of cucurbit[n]uril (CB[n]) host molecules act as supramolecular amphiphiles (SAs), which hierarchically self-assemble into various nanomaterials such as vesicles, micelles, nanorods, and nanosheets in water. The structures and functions of the nanomaterials can be controlled by supramolecular engineering of the host-guest complexes. In addition, functionalization at the periphery of CB[6] and CB[7] generates CB[n]-based molecular amphiphiles (MAs) that can also self-assemble into vesicles or micelle-like nanoparticles in water. Taking advantage of the molecular cavities of CBs and their strong guest recognition properties, the surface of the self-assembled nanomaterials can be easily decorated with various functional tags in a non-covalent manner. In this feature article, the two types (SAs and MAs) of CB-based amphiphiles, their self-assemblies and their applications for nanotherapeutics and theranostics are presented with future perspectives. ©The Royal Society of Chemistry 2019
URI
https://pr.ibs.re.kr/handle/8788114/6360
ISSN
1359-7345
Appears in Collections:
Center for Self-assembly and Complexity(복잡계 자기조립 연구단) > Journal Papers (저널논문)
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