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Salt Triggers the Simple Coacervation of an Underwater Adhesive When Cations Meet Aromatic pi Electrons in Seawater

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Title
Salt Triggers the Simple Coacervation of an Underwater Adhesive When Cations Meet Aromatic pi Electrons in Seawater
Author(s)
Sangsik Kim; Hee Young Yoo; Jun Huang; Yongjin Lee; Sohee Park; Yeonju Park; Sila Jin; Young Mee Jung; Hongbo Zeng; Dong Soo Hwang; YongSeok Jho
Publication Date
2017-07
Journal
ACS NANO, v.11, no.7, pp.6764 - 6772
Publisher
AMER CHEMICAL SOC
Abstract
Adhesive systems in many marine organisms are postulated to form complex coacervates (liquid liquid phase separation) through a process involving oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. Despite this ubiquitous speculation, most well characterized mussel adhesive proteins are cationic and polyphenolic, and the pursuit of the negatively charged proteins required for bulk complex coacervation formation internally remains elusive. In this study, we provide a clue for unraveling this paradox by showing the bulky fluid/fluid separation of a single cationic recombinant mussel foot protein, rmfp-1, with no additional anionic proteins or artificial molecules, that is triggered by a strong cation-pi interaction in natural seawater conditions. With the similar condition of salt concentration at seawater level (>0.7 M), the electrostatic repulsion between positively charged residues of mfp-1 is screened significantly, whereas the strong cation-pi interaction remains unaffected, which leads to the macroscopic phase separation (i.e., bulky coacervate formation). The single polyelectrolyte coacervate shows interesting mechanical properties including low friction, which facilitates the secretion process of the mussel. Our findings reveal that the cation-pi interaction modulated by salt is a key mechanism in the mussel adhesion process, providing new insights into the basic understanding of wet adhesion, self-assembly processes, and biological phenomena that are mediated by strong short-range attractive forces in water. © 2017 American Chemical Society
URI
https://pr.ibs.re.kr/handle/8788114/3850
ISSN
1936-0851
Appears in Collections:
Center for Soft and Living Matter(첨단연성물질 연구단) > Journal Papers (저널논문)
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