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Shin, Hee Sup
사회성 뇌과학 그룹
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Affective empathy and prosocial behavior in rodents

DC Field Value Language
dc.contributor.authorKim, Seong-Wook-
dc.contributor.authorKim, Minsoo-
dc.contributor.authorHee-Sup Shin-
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-08T05:30:01Z-
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-08T05:30:01Z-
dc.date.available2021-07-08T05:30:01Z-
dc.date.available2021-07-08T05:30:01Z-
dc.date.created2021-07-07-
dc.date.issued2021-06-
dc.identifier.issn0959-4388-
dc.identifier.urihttps://pr.ibs.re.kr/handle/8788114/9879-
dc.description.abstract© 2021 Elsevier LtdEmpathy is an essential function for humans as social animals. Emotional contagion, the basic form of afffective empathy, comprises the cognitive process of perceiving and sharing the affective state of others. The observational fear assay, an animal model of emotional contagion, has enabled researchers to undertake molecular, cellular, and circuit mechanism of this behavior. Such studies have revealed that observational fear is mediated through neural circuits involved in processing the affective dimension of direct pain experiences. A mouse can also respond to milder social stimuli induced by either positive or negative emotional changes in another mouse, which seems not dependent on the affective pain circuits. Further studies should explore how different neural circuits contribute to integrating different dimensions of affective empathy.-
dc.description.uri1-
dc.language영어-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd-
dc.subjectANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX-
dc.subjectSOCIAL TRANSMISSION-
dc.subjectFEAR-
dc.subjectPAIN-
dc.subjectMEMORY-
dc.subjectMECHANISMS-
dc.subjectNEUROSCIENCE-
dc.subjectMEDIODORSAL-
dc.subjectMODULATION-
dc.subjectATTENTION-
dc.titleAffective empathy and prosocial behavior in rodents-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.type.rimsART-
dc.identifier.wosid000668571600022-
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85107265008-
dc.identifier.rimsid75994-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorHee-Sup Shin-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.conb.2021.05.002-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY, v.68, pp.181 - 189-
dc.citation.titleCURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY-
dc.citation.volume68-
dc.citation.startPage181-
dc.citation.endPage189-
dc.type.docTypeArticle-
dc.description.journalClass1-
dc.description.isOpenAccessN-
dc.description.journalRegisteredClassscie-
dc.description.journalRegisteredClassscopus-
dc.relation.journalResearchAreaNeurosciences & Neurology-
dc.relation.journalWebOfScienceCategoryNeurosciences-
dc.subject.keywordPlusANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX-
dc.subject.keywordPlusSOCIAL TRANSMISSION-
dc.subject.keywordPlusFEAR-
dc.subject.keywordPlusPAIN-
dc.subject.keywordPlusMEMORY-
dc.subject.keywordPlusMECHANISMS-
dc.subject.keywordPlusNEUROSCIENCE-
dc.subject.keywordPlusMEDIODORSAL-
dc.subject.keywordPlusMODULATION-
dc.subject.keywordPlusATTENTION-
Appears in Collections:
Center for Cognition and Sociality(인지 및 사회성 연구단) > 1. Journal Papers (저널논문)
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