Trichobaris weevils distinguish amongst toxic host plants by sensing volatiles that do not affect larval performance

Cited 2 time in webofscience Cited 0 time in scopus
191 Viewed 5 Downloaded
Title
Trichobaris weevils distinguish amongst toxic host plants by sensing volatiles that do not affect larval performance
Author(s)
Gisuk Lee; Youngsung Joo; Celia Diezel; Eun Ju Lee; Ian T. Baldwin; Sang-Gyu Kim
Publication Date
2016-07
Journal
MOLECULAR ECOLOGY, v.25, no.14, pp.3509 - 3519
Publisher
WILEY-BLACKWELL
Abstract
Herbivorous insects use plant metabolites to inform their host plant selection for oviposition. These host-selection behaviours are often consistent with the preference–performance hypothesis; females oviposit on hosts that maximize the performance of their offspring. However, the metabolites used for these oviposition choices and those responsible for differences in offspring performance remain unknown for ecologically relevant interactions. Here, we examined the host-selection behaviours of two sympatric weevils, the Datura (Trichobaris compacta) and tobacco (T. mucorea) weevils in field and glasshouse experiments with transgenic host plants specifically altered in different components of their secondary metabolism. Adult females of both species strongly preferred to feed on D. wrightii rather than on N. attenuata leaves, but T. mucorea preferred to oviposit on N. attenuata, while T. compacta oviposited only on D. wrightii. These oviposition behaviours increased offspring performance: T. compacta larvae only survived in D. wrightii stems and T. mucorea larvae survived better in N. attenuata than in D. wrightii stems. Choice assays with nicotine-free, JA-impaired, and sesquiterpene-over-produced isogenic N. attenuata plants revealed that although half of the T. compacta larvae survived in nicotine-free N. attenuata lines, nicotine did not influence the oviposition behaviours of both the nicotine-adapted and nicotine-sensitive species. JA-induced sesquiterpene volatiles are key compounds influencing T. mucorea females’ oviposition choices, but these sesquiterpenes had no effect on larval performance. We conclude that adult females are able to choose the best host plant for their offspring and use chemicals different from those that influence larval performance to inform their oviposition decisions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Lt
URI
https://pr.ibs.re.kr/handle/8788114/2804
ISSN
0962-1083
Appears in Collections:
Center for Genome Engineering(유전체 교정 연구단) > Journal Papers (저널논문)
Files in This Item:
9_이지숙_Molecular_Ecology.pdfDownload

qrcode

  • facebook

    twitter

  • Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
해당 아이템을 이메일로 공유하기 원하시면 인증을 거치시기 바랍니다.

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse