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Glycosylation and behavioral symptoms in neurological disordersHighly Cited Paper

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Title
Glycosylation and behavioral symptoms in neurological disorders
Author(s)
Prajitha Pradeep; Hyeyeon Kang; Boyoung Lee
Publication Date
2023-05
Journal
Translational Psychiatry, v.13, no.1
Publisher
Springer Nature
Abstract
Glycosylation, the addition of glycans or carbohydrates to proteins, lipids, or other glycans, is a complex post-translational modification that plays a crucial role in cellular function. It is estimated that at least half of all mammalian proteins undergo glycosylation, underscoring its importance in the functioning of cells. This is reflected in the fact that a significant portion of the human genome, around 2%, is devoted to encoding enzymes involved in glycosylation. Changes in glycosylation have been linked to various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, autism spectrum disorder, and schizophrenia. Despite its widespread occurrence, the role of glycosylation in the central nervous system remains largely unknown, particularly with regard to its impact on behavioral abnormalities in brain diseases. This review focuses on examining the role of three types of glycosylation: N-glycosylation, O-glycosylation, and O-GlcNAcylation, in the manifestation of behavioral and neurological symptoms in neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2023, The Author(s).
URI
https://pr.ibs.re.kr/handle/8788114/13613
DOI
10.1038/s41398-023-02446-x
ISSN
2158-3188
Appears in Collections:
Center for Cognition and Sociality(인지 및 사회성 연구단) > 1. Journal Papers (저널논문)
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